z3288986 ~ Charles Byron Anthony Donlon Kilmartin ~ B. Fine Arts [4800] ~ SART6101 Experimental Arts, Summer 2014

ONE PAGE IS ENOUGH, I HOPE WE'RE ALL ON IT ALL THE SAME; SCROLL THROUGH



EXPERIMENT ONE

GETTING THE MAP
  • Go to an informant/information booth, ask for a map of their favourite spots
  • Before opening/unfolding the material selected for you, go to another person [selected at random, in or out of class] and ask them to pick one
  • Open the map

visualising-maps-on-screen.png
Mapinfo.png






EXPERIMENT TWO

SOUPING UP THE MAP
  • Pickup your old document picked-out/selected for you in experiment one
  • Throw random ingredients in a cooking mechanism
  • Boil soup to a bubble/broth which can splatter on map documents
  • Put map on pot as a lid, wait until the splatter/dots become visible
  • Join the dots









EXPERIMENT THREE

GETTING A VIBE’
  • Pickup/get-on the map you created/changed
  • Walk to the location that first comes to mind
  • Record what gets your attention and how it makes you feel


While carrying out Experiment Three, I found that – even though confronted with multiple inputs at each of the spots on the map – I was most drawn to the art around me. I tended to focus on (and therefore record) graffiti and tags – as they were the forms of visual arts that are publicly and abundantly available in the region. I was then drawn back to my person, my sense of self, my own sense of place. I have found that one tends to gravitate back to familiarity and the known, despite how far one ventures into the indefinite and experimental, the trials and tribulations, the unchartered…







INVESTIGATIONS, DEVELOPMENTS, AND OTHER THINGS TO VISUALISE:

....Put to an intensive mode designed to challenge student preconceptions as to the nature of their discipline and the ways in which experimental practice is undertaken, the focus guided group and individual experimental practice outcomes are less important than the exploratory research. That being noted, I begun with finding “serendipity” in teaching and learning activities stated in the course schedule; working through innovation and quality of experiments undertaken with a commitment to experimental research practice, attendance, attitude and participation in all course activities (in efforts to practice upon a saga of seemingly random events the city); bringing it to life with a plethora of possibilities, phenomena, purposes and progressions and, in our project[’s] sense of this practice, presentable places and/or physical locations.

I spent my time gathering data of the location in as many forms as I could - given the short period of this summer intensive. Containing and collecting things that caught my eye and mind alike, I describe in the latter paragraphs of this page the materials and means to which I used to document that location, helping to identify a physical location through the mechanism I created as a random process.

Using faded memories of a recipe my Nonna has to construct a pumpkin soup, adding randomly selected ingredients from the kitchen surrounds to randomly add to the local ‘walkabout guide’ of my current place of residence.

I took a mobile phone device as my first method of capture/collection of images – photographing things that caught my eye as they were randomly spotted onto the map by the boiling viscous fluids I had poured shallow into the scalding-hot pot [refer to video*].

The clothes on my body and glasses through which I was looking were able to further collect particles and randomise the collection process walking through the landscape.

Following the now randomised walkabout map I had generated (over the top of source material gathered from Town Hall earlier in the week from an older Aboriginal woman), I would often stop to write in my journal; leaning the book up against walls, placing it on the ground or in my lap/over my leg[s], or finding other everyday methods to scribble down some notes with a pen; rolling a cigarette/smoke here-and-there to pause and reflect.
The journal itself had already become occupied by some of the valuable words spoken in class by not only the teachers but also the students in there with me too as I had written them down wherever I thought them noteworthy, quotable, or worth drawing upon, etc… There were plenty of obstacles and problems to overcome in this process, requiring great flexibility of movement beyond the walking motion: exploring sites not necessarily open to public access, listening to the random input of sound as much as any other [extra-]sensory influences I had to battle with along the way.
The photos/videos provide example[s] of the random events that occurred throughout the three experimental processes of this course. In other words, the images attached on this page give evidence of some of the forms I encountered/collected in my practicing of this experiment.

*Journal Referencing also used for contextualization*