PLAYING GOD: EXPLORING MINCE AS A SCULTURAL MEDIUM

An idea which strongly resonated with me from Paul's presentation on Thursday was the idea of divine creation.
"Then the LORD God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being."

I thought there was a strong connection between this concept and exploring the physicality of MINCE - returning to an old idea of THE REALITY OF FLESH.

--------------------------> SO I began with a hunk of mince: a blank canvas, or, 'dust' if you will, which could then be formed and moulded by my own hands in attempt to play God - trying to create recognisable symbols of MAN / HU-MAN (hands, feet, penis). What resulted was a frenzied mash. A race against the meat losing ply and my own clumsiness. None of these body parts had any of the subtleties or tactility needed to properly recognise them, let alone bone, muscle, fibre, or a living network capable of supporting them. They quickly fell apart or reformed as mere mince piles.

I COULD NOT PLAY GOD
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HU-MAN SAUSAGE:
My next process involved focusing on using an existing mould, the condom, as an aid in helping me form recognisable body parts: in this case, the hyper-symbol of MAN, his penis. The shape quickly came to life as I struggled, fumbling the quickly-warming meat into condoms; a metaphor of struggle, heightened by the smell of latex.
---------------> What resulted was at once familiar and incredibly disconcerting: it was a disconnect between ideas of human scale/feel/tactility vs smell and sight ~the senses pitted against one another~

It would be interesting to take this idea further by creating to scale human moulds and filling them with mince: exploring the idea of the human body when its necessary components are removed.

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