Week 2

EXPERIMENTAL CONCEPT ONE

The origins of this concept lie in Bachelard's The Poetics of Space, where he writes:

"The phenomenology of the poetic imagination allows us to explore the being of man considered as the being of a surface, of the surface that separates the region of the same from the region of the other"
(p. 222)

In this case, I have applied the "porch" as the surface in which Bachelard references - whereby the porch separates the region of the same (inside) from the region of the other (outside).
Bachelard also attributes language as a bearer of the dialectics of open and closed - whereby through meaning it encloses and through poetic expression it opens up. Below is a diagram that highlights Bachelard's theory, as applied to the house:

InsideOutside_diagram.jpg

Bachelard concludes that the being of surface (/being of man) that separates these regions is deemed half-open, due to its want to be both visible and hidden and its numerous movements of opening and closing.

This theory corresponded the nature of the front porch as an area of ambiguity, separating two opposing factors (inside and outside).

I attempted to translate this theory, and thus diagram, into an artwork by utilising both image and sound coincidentally. However, I felt like this was an attack on the senses as the presence of both image and sound would convolute and confuse the theory at hand. In order to utilise what I felt to be a more sensitive sense, I chose to highlight this theory in the aural form of sound. Also, this is a style of artwork that I have not yet explored in my artmaking.

In my sound piece I have juxtaposed the two regions that bound the "being of surface", otherwise the porch. I have attempted to convey expressions of "outside" and the vast unknown, through Bachelard's prescription of poetic expression. I have then juxtaposed this expression with the opposing "inside" - by utilising language that conveys meaning. Questions that are addressed in the language of meaning include,

Q: "What is a house?"
A: Bricks, mortar, foundations, etc

Q: "How is a house built?"
A: Foundations, scaffolding, framework, etc

The "outside" is expressed through a reading of Ravi Shankar's poem, Crossings. This is juxtaposed with "inside", as expressed through a recording of an interview explaining the process of building a component home.



N.B. Copy of poem Crossings by Ravi Shankar

Between forest and field, a threshold
like stepping from a cathedral into the street—
the quality of air alters, an eclipse lifts,

boundlessness opens, earth itself retextured
into weeds where woods once were.
Even planes of motion shift from vertical

navigation to horizontal quiescence:
there’s a standing invitation to lie back
as sky’s unpredictable theater proceeds.

Suspended in this ephemeral moment
after leaving a forest, before entering
a field, the nature of reality is revealed.

Source: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/16831

N.B. Video URLs of which recordings were obtained from:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IoMMxR0iUg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpUCfojld5M&feature=related

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